To learn Mandarin Chinese email learnchinese@inchincloser.com or call / whatsapp on +91 98700 90966
Close

You are here: Home - 2016 - February

February, 2016

  • wagesAs India stands in the sunshine with her rising GDP projections, growing investments and overall sunny outlook over a gloomy global economy, in the shadows lurks responsibility. The responsibility of sizing her social sector up to International (read Western) standards.

    Taking a cue from her more stalwart neighbour China, India needs to know that with being a growing emerging market comes caveats of all kinds from afar. Looking into the growth of China and her boom from the 1990’s spurred by foreign investments, technology and capital, came the over arching western regulations to industrial production. Chinese factories which initially ran robust on low wages suddenly had to deal with the western concept of a minimal wage scheme. Office goers got insurance and social security benefits and companies had to own up to stricter environmental laws. Papers were written on the appalling state of sanitation in China’s rural areas and education was kick started by making English learning enigmatic.

    When the West invested in China, they didn’t just do so with their money, but they also poured time and energy in making her more like them. Fashion and diets changed. Holiday destinations and aspirations altered and consumer demands and family structures changed. Bringing in foreign capital meant sweeping changes for the Middle Kingdom.

    The resident soothsayer at Inchin Closer predicts the same. With India on the rise again, western media eyeing her for potential investments, collaborations and growth, the country will need to simultaneously pull her socks up in other aspects too. For investors don’t come in with a blind eye. They will want better security for their women, better infrastructure and cleaner air.

    Read more

  • make-in-indiaTaking a leaf out of China’s development handbook, India launched her “Make in India” week on Monday with much fan fare.

    Inspired by Germany’s annual Hannover Messe, India’s Make in India week is New Delhi’s effort to bring India’s manufacturing sector on par with her services sector, generate jobs and ease imports. Estimated to create a 100 million jobs and increase manufacturings contribution to the national output to 25 percent from the current 17  percent, the initiative is a massive nationwide drive to boost manufacturing in India. China’s manufacturing sector in comparison contributes 35 percent to the GDP.

    Initiated in 2014, ‘Make in India’ is a flagship of the Modi regime. The main objective is to develop a Chinese-style global manufacturing and export powerhouse that will make India one of the top 50 nations in the world on the World Bank’s Ease of Business ranking. Currently, India stands at 130.

    In comparison to her sweet and sour neighbour,  India’s desire to propel manufacturing comes from weak industrial data. Never a manufacturing powerhouse, India is now keen to increase factory output and industrial production. However in order to do this and bring in fresh investments, New Delhi needs to cut the proverbial red tape and lay out the red carpet instead. Like China she needs to give funds at affordable rates, offer cheap inputs and provide world-class infrastructure. In  addition, she will also need to bring in technology, regulate environment norms and create skilled talent to attract both domestic and international manufacturers.

    Read more

Back to top