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March, 2016

  • NSG ~ By Charmaine Mirza The Asian hotpot is simmering again. India’s bid to join the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) has put Sino-Indian geopolitics back in focus – this time with the added masala of India’s arch nemesis and China’s ally: Pakistan. The Nuclear Suppliers Group is a group of nuclear supplier countries, which aim to stave off nuclear proliferation by monitoring exports of raw materials, equipment and technology that can be deployed to create nuclear weapons. China is spearheading strong resistance from a handful of member countries to India’s NSG bid. air max Beijing’s official party line is that India has not signed the Non Proliferation Treaty (NPT), which is a vital criterion for membership to the NSG. The not-so-subtle subtext is that Pakistan has also retaliated to India’s NSG bid with one of its own – and China is the key instigator behind Pakistan’s nuclear program. nike air max 2017 dames In an ironic twist of fate, India will have to bear the brunt of Pakistan’s poor track record. If Pakistan doesn’t get in, India’s not getting China’s vote. kopen nike air max 2017 If Pakistan has built its nuclear resources from the ground up, it is largely due to the fact that China has supported it consistently, in gross violation of its own commitment to the NSG. Given Pakistan’s dubious track record of harbouring terrorists (it hasn’t signed the NPT either) and the fact that the father of its nuclear program sold nuclear technology and secrets to Iran and North Korea, red flags are waving madly across the globe about its acceptance into the NSG. Read more

  • 153917_600Two complementary, interesting trends are emerging from the warmer understanding between China and India and both nations fierce desire to constantly grow.

    Firstly, Chinese investors are eagerly watching the Indian market, coming to investigate investments and often pouring millions into Indian start ups as the Indian economy starts to trot at a slightly faster clip than the Chinese economy.

    The second interesting, emerging trend is that with the Chinese economy far ahead that of India, many entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and private equity players are visiting small to mid sized firms and start up conferences to understand and predict where the Indian market will be five to ten years from now.

    The mix of these two trends, is seeing a higher and more sophisticated level of transactions between the sweet and sour neighbours. While all of this is government agnostic, it is building stronger relationships between the two nations and filling a need gap in both economies. The Chinese have a new, energetic market to invest in and Indian start ups have an orb to see the future.

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