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  • FullSizeRenderMr. Han Zheng, Communist Party Secretary of Shanghai, and a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of China visited India on a landmark 5 day tour of Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore. Mr. Zheng who was accompanied by a 80 member business delegation met Indian Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi in New Delhi and in Mumbai met heads of companies including Mr. Cyrus P. Mistry, Chairman of Tata Sons, Mr. K V Kamath President, New Development Bank and Mr Rangarajan Vellamore CEO, Infosys Technologies (China) Co Ltd.

    The architect of modern day Shanghai, Mr. Zheng’s maiden visit of India was to lay the ground work for stronger collaborations between the two nations. While cross border investments in the IT, financial services, transport and healthcare sectors were highlighted, the leaders of the two nations also talked of building stronger links between China and India.

    Mumbai and Shanghai became sister cities in 2014, however since then little has been done to collaborate or cooperate. It is hoped that this initial visit will lay the groundwork for future ties between the two trading cities.

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  • File photo of a worker walking past a pile of steel pipe products at the yard of Youfa steel pipe plant in Tangshan in China's Hebei Province~ By Charmaine Mirza

    Bao Steel, China’s largest producer recently raised its steel prices for the first time in two years. The behemoth was leading the way for several Chinese steel factories who have subsequently raised prices due to a massive injection of funds into the domestic market which has spurred interim growth.

    Given that a massive over supply and softened demand in the domestic economy is generally the precursor to a crisis. The sudden boom in global steel prices since mid-March has left several pundits scratching their heads, most of who feel it won’t last long.cheap bns goldbuy bns gold

    Steel being a tenacious topic between China and India, Inchin Closer pauses to check the ductility of the steel industry’s Asian backbone and its butterfly effect on the global economy.

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  • Indian & Chinese travellers

    ~ By Charmaine Mirza

    The verdict is in – the Asian cocoon has been shattered and Chinese and Indian travelers are taking wing! As they pole vault across the globe, they are ruthlessly outstripping their Western counterparts, to become the world’s next travel titans.

    The recent investment made by Ctrip of China into MakeMyTrip of India, only lends more credence to this fact.

    From Iceland to Peru, to Bora Bora – these are the new frontiers for Asia’s travelati. Perennial favourites like South East Asia won’t go away, but Asian travelers are increasingly adventurous to go that extra mile – and spend that extra buck.

    Everyone wants a piece of the outbound Chinese travel pie – and why not, given that its growth is practically exponential.

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  • MBBS-Graduates-in-China-TianjinIndian students are increasingly bearing the brunt of being caught between India and China. Its a chasm that runs deep and has been mishandled by both governments.

    There are two types of Indian students in China. Medical students whose numbers have swelled to 14,000 this year and language students who are being lured by scholarships to Chinese universities to study Mandarin and become China’s soft power ambassadors. Various issues exist between the two.

    Recently a violent skirmish between two gangs of medical students in China left one severely wounded and hospitalized. The incident brought to light not only the vengeance Indians are weilding against each other but also their problems. Indian medical students who go to China because Indian medical universities are bursting at the brim, return home to find their Chinese qualifications are not recognised in India, in addition, they face language and food problems as well as being ragged by senior Indian students. While ragging is a criminal offence, none are reported to the Indian Embassy or Consulates in China for fear of repercussions. This has aggravated the problem as the students feel they are above the law.cheap bns goldbuy bns gold

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  • — By Charmaine Mirza

    JNPT - Hindu Business LineChina has swept the shipping industry off its feet in a massive tsunami wave of dominance over Asia’s waters. In comparison, India’s harbours are barely a drop in the ocean. As the Chinese economy starts to lose steam, the mandarin sea dragon is huffing and puffing to stay on top of the wave – even as the Indian ocean-crocodile starts to snap its jaws.

    Even as we conclude the Maritime India Summit, Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust (JNPT) in Mumbai, is ramping up productivity. Currently one of the largest port facilities in the country, JNPT had a record number of container lifts in 2015-16 as compared to previous years. In contrast, China’s shipping industry is flailing badly, and ruthlessly crashing its shipping rates to do whatever it takes to maintain its flagship status.cheap bns goldbuy bns gold

    So do Indian ports really hold a strategic advantage over mainland China’s anchorages? Inchin Closer takes a closer look from the crow’s nest to analyze the situation and weigh the options based on the following:

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  • 20160411-xinhua-obesitychinaTheres a good reason why marathons have become a fad in China and India. Of late with the number of overweight people outnumbering those that are underweight worldwide, its become popular to exercise and what better way to do it then out in the open with friends?

    While marathons have mushroomed across South East Asia, so have crazy diet plans and the sales of sporting goods. This predominantly stems from the fact that people in China and India are excessively getting more obese. According to a study on Global Trends in Body Mass Index (BMI), published in the medical journal, Lancet, China displaced the United States as the world’s most obese country in 2014.  The figures for China stood at 43.2 million obese men and 46.4 million obese women while the U.S. had 41.7 million obese men and 46.1 million obese women. A diet high on junk foods, crazy work hours, and a society that believes burgers to be cool can do that to a population.

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  • Small-SUV4China’s leading carmaker SAIC Motor Corp and Great Wall Motor are eager to plot profit from India, one of the last frontiers in growth close to home. With rising fuel consumption, a government that is keen to build better roads and a growing population, Chinese auto makers although late entrants, are currently waiting for permissions to clear to gain access to India. SAIC in particular is evaluating what models to launch in India and is considering vehicles less than 4 meters in length because of favorable policies — sub-compact cars attract lower taxes.

    While India isn’t new territory for SAIC Motor Corp and Great Wall Motor – both have been trying to break into the Indian market since 2012, a slowdown in the Chinese market and successive successes by other Chinese companies in India has given them new wind behind their wings.

    Analysts believe that Gujarat, the home to General Motor’s factory will be the new base for the Chinese auto giants. The speculation is further fueled by the fact that 50 percent of GM India is owned by SAIC Motor Corp in a deal that was signed in 2009 when the Chinese government bailed GM out of a financial disaster.

    Both companies are crunching numbers on India’s SUV industry specifically as the segment is expected to grow exponentially. As a percentage of total sales, SUV’s have grown to more than 30 percent of the total luxury vehicles sold in India. Companies say in a diverse market like India, which has one of the most challenging road conditions, these all-wheel-driven SUVs become the first choice for the rich because they offer both functionality and comfort.  Read more

  • ma-modiWith most of the money pouring into start-ups across China and India drying up, investors are getting a lot more sharp edged and nickel nosed about where they put their money.

    China’s slowing economy earlier pushed several investors to India to reap rich dividends from her large population. However Chinese companies now too are second guessing putting their money into India and are rather cooling their heels even as the summer approaches. Several Chinese companies including Qufenqi, a student loan company owned by Alibaba which was looking at buying into an Indian student loan firm have back tracked and are no longer interested in the Indian market as of now.

    The only beacon on the horizon seems to be Jack Ma’s Alibaba who are keen to enter India’s burgeoning e-commerce market. India is roughly estimated to be 5 years behind that of China when it comes to the adoption and implementation of new technology. This gives Alibaba a huge head start in implementing strategy for a market similar in size and value to China, and also a great advantage in knowing where the market is headed.

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  • oil-demandA tectonic shift is taking place between India and China and its becoming obvious by the subtle changes in oil consumption. According to a report by The Oxford Institute for Energy Studies this month India’s oil demand grew by 300,000 barrels a day last year, double the average rate in the previous decade while China’s growth has slowed to 300,000 barrels from an average 500,000 barrels in the decade to 2013.

    The shift heralds not only a change in the domestic economy with China moving higher up the value chain, becoming more conscious of her environmental footprint and increasing her services sectors, but also signals clearly that she will no longer be swayed by oil politics. The oligarchy of oil, means that with a drop in demand and consequently in price, China was able to alter the economies of oil producing nations such as Saudi Arabia and Iraq which gave her a foothold in international politics.

    While the shift has been gradual, the change is substantial to highlight that oil producing nations will now play into India’s hands as she holds the reigns on higher oil consumption. Foreseeing this is also probably why Rosneft,’ Russia’s largest oil company, has decided to sell nearly half of the largest oil deposit in Eastern Siberia to Indian investors. The company has ceded 49.9 percent of “Vankorneft” shares to a consortium of Indian public sector oil majors. Of these, the Oil and Natural Gas Commission (ONGC) will get 26 percent of the shares, while 23.9 percent will go to Oil India Limited (OIL), Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) and Bharat Petroleum (BPL). ‘Vankorneft’ owns a deposit with 500 million tons of oil and condensate reserves and 182 billion cubic meters of gas, reports the Rosneft press service.

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  • 153917_600Two complementary, interesting trends are emerging from the warmer understanding between China and India and both nations fierce desire to constantly grow.

    Firstly, Chinese investors are eagerly watching the Indian market, coming to investigate investments and often pouring millions into Indian start ups as the Indian economy starts to trot at a slightly faster clip than the Chinese economy.

    The second interesting, emerging trend is that with the Chinese economy far ahead that of India, many entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and private equity players are visiting small to mid sized firms and start up conferences to understand and predict where the Indian market will be five to ten years from now.

    The mix of these two trends, is seeing a higher and more sophisticated level of transactions between the sweet and sour neighbours. While all of this is government agnostic, it is building stronger relationships between the two nations and filling a need gap in both economies. The Chinese have a new, energetic market to invest in and Indian start ups have an orb to see the future.

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